Oude Kerk Amsterdam: The Garden Which is The Nearest to God

Oude Kerk Amsterdam Taturo Atzu The Garden Which is the Nearest to God

I have an insatiable thirst for new ways to experience Amsterdam, my adopted home. While browsing Instagram, I saw glimpses of a shining white platform atop the Oude Kerk in the red light district, offering city views I’d never seen before. I knew I had to go and see it for myself.

“The Garden Which is the Nearest to God” is a temporary installation by Japanese artist Taturo Aztu, who “…is internationally renowned for his temporary art projects which transform our experiences of monuments, statues and architecture.

Radically altering our perceptions, his installations provide public and intimate access to elements within our urban environment.”

The installation itself is a roof terrace centered around the weather vane and bell tower of the Oude Kerk Amsterdam, for this summer only.

Oude Kerk Amsterdam Taturo Aztu roof terrace installation

The Oude Kerk (Old Church) is the oldest building in Amsterdam, founded as a tiny wooden chapel in the 13th century. Generations of prominent city residents were buried here, including Rembrandt’s wife and muse Saska van Uylenburgh. It’s undergone three massive restorations since the 1950s.

The architectural, organizational and logistical complexity of putting such an large scale project on such a historic monument boggles my mind. I have to applaud the ambition—and execution—of it.

What is truly special about Aztu’s “Garden” are the amazing city views. There aren’t many tall buildings in Amsterdam, and especially not in the oldest part of the city known as De Wallen. Most visitors know this as the notorious Red Light District.

View overlooking Amsterdam city center from Oude Kerk Amsterdam Taturo Aztu

I went with my friend Angel on a clear, bright sunny day. We could see all the way across the historic city center (yes, it really is that small!) to Central Station and to A’Dam Toren across the river in Amsterdam Noord (both on the upper left of the photo).

For a part of the city with mostly four-story buildings, this is pretty damn cool!

View of Amsterdam historic city center De Wallen from Oude Kerk Amsterdam

I loved looking out on the busy Oudezijds Voorburgwal (try saying that 10 times fast!), the main artery of the Red Light District.

View of Oudezijds Voorburgwal from Oude Kerk AmsterdamFrom a distance and in the sunshine, it loses its neon-lit seediness and could be any charming, picturesque Amsterdam canal.

View of Dutch canal houses from Oude Kerk Amsterdam

It’s also a rare treat to see the characteristic gables that crown Amsterdam’s canal houses practically at eye level. A feast of details for those who love that kind of thing, as I do.

White wall Oude Kerk Amsterdam Taturo Aztu

I love a good wall to take portraits against, and the best one in Amsterdam right now is this one on top of the Oude Kerk. Thank you Taturo Aztu!

Solo portrait at Oude Kerk Amsterdam Taturo Aztu installation

With sunshine reflected off its pristine whiteness, it creates the best natural lighting ever.

Oude Kerk Amsterdam clock tower

While waiting for the clock to strike three, we spent the time chatting, taking pictures and sunbathing. It feels pretty special to be this close to the oldest clock tower in the city when it chimes its hourly tune.

“The Garden Which is the Nearest to God” by Taturo Aztu is at the Oude Kerk Amsterdam until the 6th of September 2015. Book tickets online at the Oude Kerk website.

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DIY wooden crate toy storage

DIY wood crate Montessori toy storage

Recently one of my lovely Instagram followers remarked that I haven’t posted a home update in a while. True! After buying our first home, decorating it, and having a baby within the last two years, things have quieted down on the interior decorating front. We’ve found a kind of equilibrium, and now it’s mostly about keeping things neat—which is harder than you think.

One quick update we’ve done was to repurpose our vintage wooden crates. These crates have been the gift that keeps on giving. We used them as a TV cabinet almost five years ago, then turned them into hallway storage for our current home. Now, we’ve repurposed them as DIY wooden crate toy storage for our toddler.

Toy storage idea from wooden crates

We cleared out our coffee tables to make our living area a big play space for Tala. Having an idea of Montessori principles for decorating kid’s spaces—I went to a Montessori preschool—I thought it would be good to put Tala’s toys in open shelving at her height. It turned out to be a great decision.

From about 1 year and 9 months, Tala has been able to pick and choose what toys she wants to play with. Even better: she puts them away herself. This is absolutely the best part and a huge relief for us parents. I started teaching her with a pack-away song. Now that she’s 2 years old, I don’t even need the song anymore, I just tell her it’s time to put her toys back.

Montessori play with DIY wooden crate toy storage

Because of the limited storage space, we’ve also had to choose the toys and books. we keep out. If it doesn’t fit in the shelf, we give it away or keep it for later. This is great in a few different ways.

First, it reminds me to pay close attention to what she’s playing with, what she’s ignoring, and how she’s playing. For example, I know within the last three months she’s moved from puzzles to pretend play, and with books she’s done with repeating new words and has moved on to acting out the scenes we read about (with props and all!).

Second, by rotating toys instead of buying new ones , we get to bring out toys that she’s forgotten about and still give her the excitement of a “new” toy. It’s kind of sneaky, but honestly at this age she doesn’t know the difference—and we can use the money for other things.

Third, it’s done wonders to help prevent toddler toys from taking over our home. Tala doesn’t really play in the kitchen or hallway or other weird spaces, because she knows she has her own space with all her favorite things.

DIY wooden crate toy storage for toddlers

 

Commercial break: can you believe how pudgy and babyish Tala still is in these pictures?! We rearranged the crates and took these photos in January (sorry, bad blogger). Now, she’s definitely more little girl than baby. But she still uses the storage in the same way.

Toddler toy storage from wood crates

Some tips to consider if you’d like to repurpose wooden crates as toy storage:

Consider your child’s personality. We are fortunate to have a toddler who is not “climb and destroy” type, so we felt very comfortable doing this. I know other parents who wouldn’t dream of it. But it’s also possible to teach kids that the shelves are not for climbing. You’d have to do it for other pieces of furniture anyway, right?

Toddler-proof your wooden crates. Sand down wood to prevent splinters. Hammer back or pry out any nails that may cause injuries. Reinforce your shelves with non-nail alternatives—we used rope to tie the crates together in the back.

Try out different configurations. Mix and match! Stack crates horizontally for books and smaller toys. Line them up vertically for bigger toys. Just make sure to keep everything within your child’s height.

I have another DIY wooden crate project up my sleeve, but first I’d love to know what you think of this one. Do you use wooden crates at home and how do you use them?

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A’DAM Toren Amsterdam: Icon under construction

Every city has an iconic landmark. Berlin’s Brandenburger Tor, Paris’s Eiffel Tower or Rome’s Coliseum are all beautiful and recognizable, but these days they mostly serve as backdrops for the requisite tourist selfie. They’re also somewhat cut off from the real life of a city.

As urban dwellers, our participation in the life of these iconic structures is limited. We can’t really know them intimately—run our hands over their bones, poke around in their guts, or watch them grow. What would it have been like to see them as they were being built?

Short of traveling back in time, that’s not really possible. Or is it?

A'DAM Toren Amsterdam The Making of a Landmark

This is why I couldn’t miss out on a very special Instameet organized by the IGersAmsterdam community. To mark Dag van De Bouw (National Construction Day) on June 13, IGersAmsterdam offered 20 local Instagrammers access to the construction site of A’DAM Toren Amsterdam, the city’s newest landmark.

Rising 22 stories high, A’DAM Toren Amsterdam was the former headquarters of Shell, located along the IJ river across Amsterdam Central Station. When Shell moved to their new headquarters, the building designed by architect Arthur Staal—known as Toren Overhoeks, or ‘Diagonal Tower’, for its 45-degree angle to the river—was open for redevelopment.

Concepts were bidded out, and the choice was made: to make the tower into a creative hub, and to finally build the iconic observation deck that Amsterdam never had. Born of a four-way partnership among creative individuals, the vision was brought to life by architects Claus & Van Wageningen. Renovation of the tower began in July 2014 and is scheduled for completion in April 2016.

A'DAM Toren Amsterdam under construction elevator

The plans for A’DAM Toren sound amazing. The tower’s main draw and crowning glory, quite literally, is called The Crown. Sitting on top of the tower, this structure will contain the Lookout: a diagonal viewing deck on the 2oth and 21st floors, with a 360-degree panorama of Amsterdam.

A'DAM Toren Amsterdam observation deck view from The Crown

There is nothing like this in Amsterdam. You can see clear across the city to Schiphol airport, even on a characteristically cloudy day. For convenience, nothing beats the accessibility to Central Station which is a five-minute (free!) ferry ride away.

The Crown took nine months to develop and a mindblowing three days to install. Three days! That’s first world construction for you.

A'DAM Toren Amsterdam shooting view of Central Station

What was fantastic about this Instameet was that we got to climb even higher than the Lookout—right up on the rooftop of the A’DAM Toren itself, which isn’t open to the general public, not even for National Construction Day.

The Lookout will also contain a bar and restaurant on the 20th floor, a revolving restaurant on the 19th floor, and…. a giant swing on the very edge of the roof. Say whaaat?! I have a mild-to-moderate fear of heights, but I. Cannot. Wait.

A'DAM Toren Amsterdam windblown hair

What’s better than going to a super cool, limited-access location? Going there with a bunch of fun, friendly and talented photographers! No need for selfies here—it was so easy to just make friends and hand them my camera or phone. I think the last time I had so many nice pictures taken of myself was at my wedding.

A'DAM Toren Amsterdam Instagrammers on roof

In the company of fellow ‘grammers, nobody twice about lying down on steel beams or taking a picture of your feet dangling off the side of the building. Who says its lonely at the top?

But wait, there’s more to A’DAM Toren Amsterdam than the view. Come and see, after the jump.

[Read more…]

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The Store at Soho House Berlin

There are things that draw me in, and things that turn me away. For example, I’m attracted to creativity, but intimidated by luxury. This was on my mind when after-work wanderings led me into The Store at Soho House Berlin, a concept store fusing design, food, furnishings, clothing, beauty, books and music in a stylish luxury setting.

As I browsed The Store, part of me waited for the point when an exorbitant price tag or a snooty sales associate would eventually make me want me to step out. As it turned out, that moment never came.

The Store Soho House Berlin

I was both secretly delighted and suitably impressed. How can a space that is so beautifully sleek, so achingly cool, also feel so inviting?

The Store Soho House Berlin colorful cafe seating area

The Urban Jungle Bloggers will probably tell you: it’s the plants.

The Store Soho House Berlin big plant

At The Store, maximalist explosions of green warm up the space, giving it an eclectic and casual vibe.

The Store Soho House Berlin green cinema chairs

This makes it feel less like an expensive store where you’re not allowed to touch anything, and more like a very cool (and wealthy) friend’s home where you can just hang out and chat over coffee.

The Store Soho House Berlin coffee and cactus

The Store Soho House Berlin rattan swing chair

The Store Soho House Berlin copper bureau and big plants

The plants at The Store are huge. They really make a statement! Something about them calls to my tropical soul—the same part of me that insists on keeping a big fig tree by my desk in cold and gray Amsterdam.

The Store Soho House Berlin giant plants

I would have loved to stop by the funky nail bar upstairs for some pampering, but I was working then.

The Store Soho House Berlin nail bar

From the nail bar, you get an overview of the whole store. Looks rather different when you don’t see all the big, beautiful plants, doesn’t it?

The Store Soho House Berlin overall layout

I may not make my living in a visual or retail industry, but creative spaces like The Store inspire me. Being able to bring together different objects, moods, influences and ideas so that they live comfortably together, is something I’m always drawn to and admire.

I love discovering places like this. Don’t you?

The Store
Soho House Berlin
Torstrasse 1
thestore-berlin.com

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Travel Diary: Berlin

Do you ever put off blogging because you want to write the perfect post—carefully researched, well-selected photos, thoughtfully written… then life just takes over and you never seem to find the time? This is the story of my life lately. It’s already summer, and I have yet to blog about my spring travels.

I’ve decided to say “So what?” to perfection, otherwise I’ll never get any blog posts written! Let’s go for something short, sweet and simple: a travel diary of my (already not-so-recent) trip to Berlin.

Berlin Soho House selfie with Alexanderplatz TV Tower

When I learned I would be sent to Berlin for a client shoot, I was thrilled. What began as a weekend fling years ago grew into a love affair with this captivating city. After being back several times, it has already begun to feel familiar—yet Berlin being Berlin, it will always be unknowable, a chameleon, constantly evolving.

To recognize parts of yourself in a place, yet be confronted with secrets to discover and enigmas to unravel —for me, that makes perfect travel alchemy.

Berlin Brandenburger Tor tattooed organ grinder

It’s no secret that I love food, and in Berlin good food is abundant, varied and best of all, affordable. The Diplomatic Wife and I pigged out on a massive brunch at Cabslam in Neukolln—including the best salted caramel cheesecake I’ve had in years… no, wait, ever—and our restaurant bill was ridiculously low, a fraction of what it would have been for a meal of the same quality in Amsterdam.

Berlin Cabslam salted caramel cheesecake

I love street art, too. In this facet of urban life, Berlin is a feast for the eyes…

Berlin street art girls dancing

a constantly evolving gallery.

Berlin street art JR paste remnants

I’m positive this used to be a huge mural by JR!

One of the press perks of my working visit was a private evening tour of the Alte Nationalgalerie. Led through a darkened museum by a bearded old art historian with thousands of tales to tell, I learned the secret story of why this innocent-looking painting by Manet caused a scandal in the 1800s, and had to be banned…

Auguste Renoir In Sommer Berlin National Galerie

and also recognized shades of my own domestic life, those too-familiar tantrums and tears, in this marble Venus and Cupid. Again, that fine line between discovery and familiarity, being transported and finding yourself at home.

Berlin National Galerie Venus and Cupid sculpture

My shoot was at Soho House on Torstrasse in Mitte, and I loved wandering around that area after work. From hipsters to hausfraus, iced lattes to hot latex, the diversity of cafes, shops, businesses and restaurants makes for fascinating window shopping.

Berlin old book frontispieces wallpaper store

A shop along Torstrasse beautifully wallpapered with antique front pages

Where else can seventeenth-century cemeteries coexist so closely with third wave coffee bars? That’s Berlin, where there’s always a dark undercurrent to all the energy, a poignant counterpoint to all the hipness.

Berlin Alter Garnisonsfriedhof

I’m tempted to say I feel something of Manila in Berlin, and in a way, being in Berlin relieves my homesickness a little bit. Okay, German efficiency and Filipino chaos seem universes apart. If you’ve been to both cities, maybe you can tell me if I’m on to something here, or if I’m just crazy.

Berlin U-Bahn

On your travels, have you ever felt that sweet spot between familiarity and discovery? Where does it happen for you? I’d love to know.

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